Ed y Yo Part 2 (conclusión)

Here’s the second and final part of Ed and Me -- In Spanish. Illustrations courtesy of the inimitable Mr. Edwards. I think his doodles are great even though I don’t quite approve of his renderings of the author.

More soon.
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Ed and Me Part 2 (conclusion)

Here’s the second and final part of Ed and Me. Illustrations courtesy of the inimitable Mr. Edwards. I think his doodles are great even though I don’t quite approve of his renderings of the author.

More soon.


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Ed y Yo Part 1 Spanish

Esta anécdota enfoca un momento en una serie de situaciones médicas. La decisión de proceder con una cirugía al corazón de hecho había sido tomada hace algunos años, pero antes de concretarla, se me diagnosticó un cáncer. En torno a eso cuelga otra historia, pero esta como tal es en si bastante buena. Read More...
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Social Science, Medical Adventures, Ed and Me Part 1

I’ve been writing about science and especially medicine of late. As you know I think we have to always keep in mind that science is a deeply empirical, experimental task, and that means results are more or less tentative. For the sciences that claim to understand human beings, their motivations and actions, they tend to be very tentative. No problem, if you take the results as suggestive but a real disaster if you believe they are “capital T”, True.

Consider:
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Science, and reflections triggered by Tony's Book

Having posted all this science related stuff I really feel the need to comment on my understanding of the limits and power of science, as well as on the relation between and science and spirituality in general, and science and Siloism in particular. However, even more than I want to do that I want to tell you about a friend’s new book and why it got me really a bit pissed off (because of something it put me in mind of, not because of the book). But first let me just say that, it seems some people are dubious when it comes to certain kinds of experiments especially those in the “soft” fields like sociology and psychology (the kinds of things I’ve been referencing here). And I must admit I’m one of them. Questionable experimental design, over interpretation of results based on small sample size, etc. etc. often lead to highly questionable results even when dressed up in their scientific best.

I recently had the, almost unmitigated, pleasure of reading Tony Robinson’s new autobiography, Coffee with Silo: and the quest for meaning in life (Tony has generously made it freely available and you can get a copy here).

coffee with silo sir tony robinson
Tony’s Book. No, not this Tony Robinson, even though they are both Brits. Read More...
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Science, the Spiritual and Vaccines

In the last couple of days I have received some comments and information from friends in different parts of the planet. Bruno Pezzuto, from chile sent me this article about the intoxicated dolphins (see my Jan 2 posting) for Spanish speakers. And David Andersson sent me this article about new research on the function of sleep.

These articles, and my Jan 3rd posting regarding the spatial registers of emotion in the body draw on recent scientific and medical research. I was going to post an entry about some of Silo’s ideas regarding science and siloism but the last few days has also seen some of our friends circulating (apparently with approval) an article on the evils of vaccination programs. Read More...
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Conscience, Objective Morality, Monkey Biz

Morality and our sense of justice (or injustice) are interesting things: is there some sort of “objective” morality? Is there a “conscience” that is the same in all of us?

For many “believers”, it is only their particular faith that holds the key to right action. In all seriousness they ask whether, without god, non-believers, “atheists” or others can even act morally. They could ask my friend Jamy...

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Emotions and Where We Feel Them

I said that I would be telling you some more about my investigations (and discoveries) about the history of distillation, alcohol, and the search for the sacred. But as I mentioned to Mark (see yesterday’s comments) I’d like to make a small detour to another theme. I’ll get back to these other subjects but…

Here’s some very cool empirical research that supports the idea that emotions are registered in particular zones of the body and these areas are the same across cultures.
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Intoxicated Dolphins, Puffer Fish and Zombies

I ended yesterday with a quote from William Blake. Here’s another, this time from The Marriage of Heaven and Hell.

If the doors of perception were cleansed
everything would appear to man as it is, infinite.


Aldous Huxley used that line for the title of his famous 1954 essay The Doors of Perception about his experience with the psychedelic drug mescaline. It was followed by another essay a few years later titled, what else but, Heaven and Hell.

Copies of those essays are available online here (under resources) and also a BBC video a long interview with Huxley.


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The History of the Sacred and of Getting Stoned


It is true that the change of the calendar year never struck me as important. This year however is different. I’m making my first ever New Year’s resolution and I think there’s good reason why.

Meanwhile I’ll modify this blog to share tidbits of news, thoughts, notions that I find of interest. They’ll range from Siloism, to science, to daily life.

I’ll start to day with the science of ecstasy...

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